February 3, 2021

NightCare is ending the cycle of the perpetual sex industry.

NightCare: Ending the Cycle of the Sex Industry

Written by: McKenzie Thompson, Communications and Logistics Coordinator

NightCare is more than a place of physical rest for the babies of sex workers overnight. It is a place of mental rest, peace, and hope. NightCare is setting these babies up for a better life and working towards ending the cycle of the sex industry.

“If I had this type of support when I was a child, I would not be living this hell.”

 

These are the words of Adhi’s mother, Ani, a sex worker who sends her baby girl to NightCare. Tearing up, she told us she was thankful that Saving Moses shows her daughter love and affection. If only Ani had had the same type of care as a young girl.

Ani grew up with parents who dreamed of giving her a good life. They tried to provide her with everything she needed and wanted. They wanted her to grow up, be successful, and have a joyful life. However, one day, sorrow filled their happy home when Ani’s mother died after suffering from an unknown disease. At the young age of 7, Ani’s life had drastically changed, and little did she know, it would get worse.

After her mother’s death, Ani’s father remarried. They were poor, and access to food was scarce. Because of that, Ani’s father arranged her marriage at just 12-years-old. Ani’s life took a turn for the worst after moving into her mother-in-law’s house. Her mother-in-law and husband began severely abusing her, making her life unbearable. Then, Ani soon realized she was pregnant. She thought maybe if she had a baby boy, her fate would change, and her husband would no longer abuse her but be happy instead. However, though she had a baby boy, her life did not get any better.

Ani knew she had to flee her current situation if she was ever going to have a better life.

 

She finally decided to leave her husband and flee with her baby to a different city to search for a job where she could support her baby boy. One evening on her journey, exhausted from traveling, she decided to sit down and rest. She fell asleep and woke up to no sign of her baby. Someone kidnapped him. Horrifically, this situation is not uncommon.

Babies and toddlers are often kidnapped while their mothers work on the streets as sex workers.

NightCare saves babies and toddlers from the dangers of the streets and perpetual cycle of the sex industry.

After losing her baby, she was sold into a brothel where her landlady kept her locked in a room, never allowed to leave. One night, her landlady’s son, Sentu, came into Ani’s room at the brothel. That’s when Ani became pregnant with Adhi. Sentu did not and has never taken responsibility for his daughter, and yet again, Ani is left to do this alone. She is still a sex worker but is doing everything she can to keep Adhi from living this hell.

It breaks our hearts to hear stories like these. Many mothers we work with were destined for a life in sex work from the time they were born. In this region, being born into a family of sex work, poverty, or no educational opportunities means you have minimal options for how you are going to support your family. Like Ani said, if she had NightCare as a child, she would not have lived the hell that she did.

Our hope with NightCare is that babies like Adhi, who attend, will not grow up to endure the same hardships of their mothers or become like the men who abuse their mothers. Nighttime is when these babies are most vulnerable to abuse, exploitation, or neglect. NightCare prevents further abuse from happening, helps babies heal from past trauma, allows them to thrive and be a kid, and ultimately prepares them for the future.

Crying, Ani told us, “I am surprised and thankful to Saving Moses. They are providing a safe, tenable place for brothel children.” It is hard for some women in this area to trust that people want to protect their babies. It’s surprising to them when they hear that a facility exists to do just that! Ani said, “My daughter is growing in a safe place and getting nutritious food, as well as getting love and affection from the nannies! I expect from my heart, long live Saving Moses!”

NightCare is ending the cycle of the perpetual sex industry for families like Adhi and Ani.

We agree, Ani. Long Live Saving Moses! Please help us end the cycle of the sex industry by donating today.

Learn more about NightCare HERE 

February 3, 2021

NightCare: Ending the Cycle of the Sex Industry

NightCare is more than a place of physical rest for the babies of sex workers overnight. It is a place of mental rest, peace, and hope. NightCare is setting these babies up for a better life and working towards ending the cycle of the sex industry. Read More»

October 1, 2020

Why Should I Care About Babies Across the World? Executive Director, Heidi Cortez, feeding therapeutic milk to a malnourished baby in Angola.

WHY SHOULD I CARE ABOUT BABIES ACROSS THE WORLD? 

By: Director of Operations, Heidi Cortez

In global humanitarian work, there is a question we are often asked- Why should I care about what happens to babies and toddlers I will never meet that live in a country I will never visit? Or why should I help babies and toddlers in other countries when there is a need here in the US? Here are some reasons why we do the work that we do: 

A Commitment to a Bigger Backyard  

One of my friends spent several months in South Sudan working in education. People would ask her why she didn’t work in the US or “in her own back yard.” Her response was, “I just have a bigger back yard than you.”  

Before we were a citizen of any country, we are a human. Our humanity is what connects us. It transcends all borders and divisions. While our experiences, culture, and language may differ, we have the same emotions, desires, and fears. Our humanity unites us. I have personally sat mother to mother with a lady in Cambodia who was suffering from Aids. We both cried because she expressed her desire to “just be a good mom,” an ache I share daily for my son.  

When we expand our backyard, we expand. We see the humanity in everyone and honor it. We expand our personal borders to caring about people we may never meet and countries we will never visit. We are better global citizens who have a deep care for others around the world. It fosters a love inside of us that is for everyone.  

A Commitment to Serving  

One argument for not helping those in other countries is that you do not know what that country needs unless you are from that country. You do not understand their culture, systems, language, and problems- so how can you help? For this, we wholeheartedly agree! We don’t know any of these things, so we work hand in hand with people on the ground who do. We tap into the local knowledge and perspectives of local people and utilize their knowledge to inform our programs. We have often adjusted our programs based on their insights. Our goal is to serve the local populations. We do not come with all the answers to save the day. No, we view ourselves as allies and helpers, not leaders and saviors.  

Why Should I Care About Babies Across the World? - Two children wearing masks and walking through trash near the railroad tracks.

A Commitment to Least Available  

While there are opportunities for change in the US, we are the wealthiest nation on the planet. We have the resources that many other countries do not. I am in no way saying our systems are perfect, and there is no need. But, we are much more equipped to help those in need. I have traveled to countries and have seen babies and toddlers living in extreme conditions. In Africa, I held babies and toddlers who were skin and bone, fighting for survival because of absolutely no nutrition. In Asia, I witnessed low to no services available for abused babies and toddlers stuck in the sex industry. These problems are widespread, affecting thousands upon thousands of babies and toddlers every year. Many of these foreign governments are either unwilling or unable to help, which is too heartbreaking to imagine.  

Why Should I Care About Babies Across the World? - NightCare Nannies

With all of these commitments, the main point is to do something, anything to help. For you, that may mean in your neighborhood, and that is okay. But for others, it may mean crossing country lines and helping a baby or toddler who needs it. If so, we would love to have you join us and save babies where help is most needed but least available.  

October 1, 2020

Why Should I Care About Babies Across the World?

In global humanitarian work, there is a question we are often asked- Why should I care about what happens to babies and toddlers I will never meet that live in a country I will never visit? Or why should I help babies and toddlers in other countries when there is a need here in the US?  Read More»

August 26, 2020

Addressing the Lack of Child Human Rights

Written by: Matt Nathaniel, Regional NightCare Director

 

When we feel sorry for children who are ignored, uncared for, and abused, we are moved with compassion. This is a natural human response. Over the decades, individuals and social justice organizations have taken a compassion-based approach when working with children. Is it time to take a rights-based approach in addressing the injustices the children face?

This article will challenge you to go beyond taking a compassion-based approach to a rights-based approach.

UNCRC

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, or UNCRC, is the most complete statement of children’s rights ever produced. It is the most widely ratified international human rights treaty in history.

The UNCRC defines the child as a person under 18 years of age. It acknowledges the primary role of parents and the family in the care and protection of children and the obligation of the State to help them carry out these duties.

The UN Convention consists of 41 articles, each of which details a different type of right. These rights are grouped under the following themes:

  1. Survival rights: include the child’s right to life and the needs that are most basic to its existence, such as nutrition, shelter, an adequate living standard, and access to medical services.
  2. Development rights: include the right to education, play, leisure, cultural activities, access to information, and freedom of thought, conscience, and religion.
  3. Protection rights: ensure children are safeguarded against all forms of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, including specialized care for refugee children; safeguards for children in the criminal justice system.
  4. Participation rights: encompass children’s freedom to express opinions, to have a say in matters affecting their own lives, to join associations, and to assemble peacefully.

A little toddler girl standing in a pile of garbage.Saving Moses works for children under five, who live in brothels and red-light districts. Following a recent focused group discussion conducted among its grassroots staff in three different countries, the following were some of the key findings:

  • Mothers do not provide enough psychosocial support to their children.
  • Children are exposed to theft, drugs, and violence – they are drugged in most cases.
  • Children do not always experience genuine love and care.
  • Children do not get proper nutrition, but often are malnourished.
  • Children face a high risk of being stolen or sold, especially with very low, or no income for the mothers.
  • Children are forced to sell condoms on the streets.
  • Children are often physically abused.

Please note the above findings were from one context: the sex industry in the three countries Saving Moses works. When looking closely at the findings above, it is evident that children living in these places need rights to survive, develop, protect, and participate. We must acknowledge that mothers alone cannot ensure that their children’s rights are not violated. Many people are responsible for the safety and wellbeing of children living in these places. The mothers of the children, personnel from Saving Moses, community people the children often come across, clients who come to the red-light districts and brothels, professionals from government and other agencies who visit these places, and many others. It takes collective responsibility to ensure children enjoy their rights.

Parental powers

Parents have sufficient powers to fulfill their duties to the child. Parents uniquely affect the lives of children. Issues in the child-parent relationship include child neglect, child abuse, freedom of choice, corporal punishment, and child custody. Parents need to know they have a huge responsibility to fulfill their duties so that their children enjoy their rights.

Cambodian mother holding her young baby.

We are the eyes and voice for children

The most powerless members of society are children. In most cases, they will not even realize that they are subjected to human rights violations. We must be their eyes.

Unlike adults, children cannot speak for themselves. It is the responsibility of adults to be vigilant about any possible child rights violations and be proactive in addressing them most appropriately. We must be their voice.

A call to collective response to address child rights violation

An African proverb goes like this, “It takes a village to raise a child.” That means an entire community of people must interact with children for those children to experience and grow in a safe and healthy environment. In a society that is becoming more and more individualistic, we must care for our neighbors and ensure we play a part in making sure children are safe. It is a collective responsibility of a whole community to ensure children exercise their rights to survival, development, protection, and participation.

Conclusion

When a child is subjected to a violation of child rights, we should both be moved with compassion and fight for the rights of the child. It must be a collective response of a whole community. Let us address the child rights violations today so that we create a safer and healthier tomorrow for our children.

August 26, 2020

Addressing the Lack of Child Human Rights

Addressing the Lack of Child Human Rights Written by: Matt Nathaniel, Regional NightCare Director   When we feel sorry for children who are ignored, uncared for, and abused, we are moved with compassion. This is a natural human response. Over the decades, individuals and social justice organizations have taken a compassion-based ... Read More»

August 12, 2020

2019 - A Year to Remember - Founder Sarah and baby from our malnutrition clinic. 2019 Saving Moses Highlights

Written by: Communications and Logistics Coordinator, McKenzie Thompson

In 2019, we saved a total of 9,506 babies and toddlers! That means that together, we saved 4,764 MORE little ones last year compared to the previous year in 2018.

We could not have done that without YOU!


B I R T H A I D 

We cared for 3,816 babies and pregnant mothers in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria. We provided community-based education on safe birthing practices and infant care, skilled birth attendants to assist in safe births, pediatrician visits for babies and toddlers, pregnancy well-woman visits, and breastfeeding education.

These regions have been devastated by war for years, and hospitals and clinics are primary targets during conflicts. Because of this, access to healthcare is minimal. Many women and their children live too far from a healthcare facility where they can safely give birth or receive care and cannot afford to travel. That challenge, plus the lack of knowledge of safe birthing practices and infant care, lead to many preventable deaths. Thanks to our BirthAid program, nearly 4,000 women and their babies received the necessary and essential care that they needed.

This program:

  • helped 71 babies be born safely
  • provided doctor visits for 3,745 children under the age of 5
  • gave 1,126 pregnant women consultations in 2019 

M A L N U T R I T I O N 

5,207 babies and toddlers were cured of malnutrition in Africa last year! High food insecurity, caused by constant conflict, drought, and poverty, has made Severe Acute Malnutrition prevalent in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Currently, 37.6% of children under 5 in Angola and 42.7% in the DRC, suffer from this disease. We provide those babies and toddlers with therapeutic milk specially formulated to give them all the nutrients they need. We now have an 89.5% success rate in our malnutrition clinics, which means that most babies who come, get better, and can return home. We are at our lowest withdrawal rate ever, at 6%, meaning most babies stay at the clinic until their treatment is complete, resulting in higher cure rates!

Saving Moses saved 488 MORE babies from malnutrition last year than we did in 2018!


N I G H T C A R E

We protected 483 babies and toddlers from the sex industry in 2019. They received a safe place to sleep, a warm bath, clean clothes, a nutritious meal, playtime, and therapeutic care from our nannies every night. Without NightCare, many of them grow up in brothels, sleep on the streets, or experience abuse and neglect. Your support allows these babies to be kids and live a happy, healthy life. We also opened two new NightCare centers in Bangladesh and India and were able to protect 167 MORE babies in 2019 than in 2018.

In 2019, we provided 32,894 NightCare visits to babies and toddlers.

Cambodia153 new babies attended NightCare, 285 babies total attended NightCare, and we provided 25,099 NightCare visits to babies growing up in the sex industry.

India: We opened our first center in this country, protected 10 babies from the sex industry, and provided 80 visits.

Bangladesh: We opened our second center in this country, 148 new babies attended NightCare, 188 babies total were cared for, and overall, we provided 7,715 visits in the NightCare center.


2019 - A Year to Remember - two little boys hugging. 2019 Saving Moses Highlights

We cannot wait to keep growing, changing lives, and saving babies with you. To read more details on 2019, check out our official Annual Report HERE

Thank you for all that you do to support this cause,

The Saving Moses Team

August 12, 2020

2019 – A Year to Remember

Written by: Communications and Logistics Coordinator, McKenzie Thompson In 2019, we saved a total of 9,506 babies and toddlers! That means that together, we saved 4,764 MORE little ones last year compared to the previous year in 2018. We could not have done that without YOU! B I R T H A I D  We... Read More»

June 23, 2020

Work with Children, End Poverty

Work with Children, End Poverty - baby boy playing in the dirt.

Written by Regional NightCare Director, Matt Nathaniel

Note: Reference to children includes babies and toddlers too. 

The world, in general, is not in the way it ought to be. Our greatest concern is poverty. The genuinely poor are those robbed of the ability to make choices for themselves – the choice for safe and clean water, the choice of education, the choice of protection from abuse, the choice of medical care, the choice of participation, the choice of development and more.

Children are Almost Half of the World’s Extreme Poor

1 in 7 people live in extreme poverty, or over 900 million people live in extreme poverty. Of these, a shockingly high number are children. Specifically, 47% of all people living in extreme poverty across the world are 18 years old or younger. These poor children will grow up to be poor adults. It indicates the need for child rights intervention.

Children are the Most Excluded Social Group

Research says children are the most oppressed and excluded social groups. The exclusion of children is not only subjected to children who suffer from various physical, mental, and social disadvantages, but it’s an issue common among most children. The problem is with our understanding of who children are and how we see and treat them.

The Most Powerless Members of Society are Children

We often see children being punished or ill-treated or abused just because they cannot retaliate due to their limitations. Harming a child is not an act of power. It conveys the fact that we are powerless. The bitter truth is, when the child experiences abuse, it grows in fear and misplaced trust. The babies Saving Moses works with are often subjected to mistreatment, abuse, and torture, either by their mother or the clients. They are always at risk. 

Work with Children, End Poverty - two children playing in trash.

Finding the Poor

A decade ago, I visited a government-run orphanage home in the south of India. On my very first visit, I noticed something strange. Throughout the two hours I spent with the babies in that center, the babies remained quiet. It simply did not add up. Being a father of a five-year-old, I know how much sound (crying in particular), part of a child’s communication mechanism is – whether to acknowledge or revolt or negotiate or attract the attention. Those babies probably cried at one time. They once tried to acknowledge, revolt, negotiate, or attract the attention of others. But help probably never came. And they probably decided to accept their reality and remain silent. We must go in search of the poor. It must be us who should take those first steps. We have to find those in need. We must become intentional in the way we defend the rights of children.

Seeing the Potential in Each Child

Each child deserves the right to protection, but they also deserve the opportunity to unleash their potential as they grow. Can you imagine the opportunity we as adults have for creating an impact in the lives of the little ones? When we invest our resources in them, we invest not only in their future but also in the future of society. Investing in children’s life is a gesture for the common good. Children have the potential to become agents of change. 

Work with Children, End Poverty - a little girl doing her school work.

Children Transform Us

As much as we must commit to impact the lives of the young ones, we can experience transformation through them. When we begin to see the world through the eyes of a child, we can only become pure in our hearts and minds. Children have the untainted inner faculties for creative imagination, conscience, connectedness, and intuition. Every time we spend time with children and babies, we experience change, change for better.

Conclusion

Working with children is urgent in terms of their vulnerability; at the same time, it is an excellent opportunity for change because they are the future. Below are three principles we all should remember.

a. Care for children because they are the most vulnerable.

b. Invest in children because they are the future, and we can break the cycle of poverty.

c. Spend time with children because they change us for the better.

Work with Children, End Poverty - Cambodia Team Trip Member playing and laughing with a little girl in NightCare center.

June 23, 2020

Work with Children, End Poverty

Work with Children, End Poverty Written by Regional NightCare Director, Matt Nathaniel Note: Reference to children includes babies and toddlers too.  The world, in general, is not in the way it ought to be. Our greatest concern is poverty. The genuinely poor are those robbed of the ability to make choices for themselves – the... Read More»

May 22, 2020

The Effects of COVID-19 on NightCare - NightCare nanny taking COVID-19 precautions with NightCare babies.

Written by Saving Moses Communication’s Coordinator, McKenzie Thompson

The news about the global COVID-19 outbreak spread almost as fast as the virus itself, but several questions were left unanswered. Where did it originate? When will it be over? Will I lose my job? Questions like these have flooded the minds of people all over the world, and in a time of uncertainty such as this, it’s easy to get scared or worried.

This virus has affected millions of people’s health and their businesses, jobs, educations, graduations, vacations, weddings, and so much more. This pandemic has hugely inconvenienced me, as well. It’s disappointing and discouraging for all of us. We have all been affected in different ways that deserve attention and warrant valid emotions regarding the effects of COVID-19. Still, I want us to take a second and look at this through the eyes of the world’s most vulnerable population.

I can’t stop thinking about the babies and toddlers around the world who are suffering every day of their lives, pandemic or not. I think about the little ones whose mothers work in the sex industry as their only means of providing. The babies who go to work with their mothers in brothels, get left at home alone, roam the streets with the possibility of being stolen until their mother returns, or stay with an abusive neighbor or family member. That is the life they’re used to but add a global pandemic on top, and it becomes even more of an unimaginable living condition.

The Effect of COVID-19 on NightCare - Woman holding her baby girl.

Since the mothers in the sex industry are not able to work during this time, they are left even more vulnerable than before, with no money to buy everyday essentials for themselves, let alone their babies. No income, combined with no healthcare access, makes it extremely hard to survive in general, but nearly impossible with this pandemic. The virus is more likely to transmit in brothels and slums, so even after the curve lowers, there will be a prolonged waiting time for the mothers to return to work.

If a mother can’t provide for herself, she can’t provide for her children. Those babies living in a prominent red-light district are relocating to their relatives’ places, which increases the risk of abuse, neglect, or trafficking. What is the right answer? What happens to these families? 

Saving Moses’ whole mission is to provide care where the need is most urgent, and the help is least available. We know how vulnerable the babies who attend our NightCare centers are, so when this pandemic hit, we knew we had to do more. They can always get food, formula, clean clothes, a bed, and more at NightCare, but when the social distancing rules took effect, a temporary plan had to be put in place to combat these new obstacles.

The Effects of COVID-19 on NightCare - bags of diapers, nutritional supplements, and soap for our NightCare babies during the pandemic.

We are now providing mothers and their babies with Care Boxes that include essential items such as diapers, formula, food, and soap. Throughout the week, mothers [or fathers] bring their babies to our centers to get their Care Box. Upon arrival, the NightCare nannies meet them at the door with masks on, take their temperature, and sanitize their hands. Then, they hand them a FREE Care Box with all the items they need to make their lives a little easier. We have seen such a positive reaction from the mothers regarding the impact of these Care Boxes.

One mother told us…

“Thank you, Saving Moses, for providing free food, milk, diapers, vitamins, soap, shampoo, and other supplies to my baby during this time of desperate need. Because of the impact of COVID-19, I have no work or money to buy food for my baby. Without this organization, I don’t know what or where I would be now.”

The Effects of COVID-19 on NightCare - NightCare nanny handing a bag of nutritional supplements, diapers, and soap to a NightCare baby during the pandemic.

This somehow breaks and warms my heart at the same time. I have a job, a safe place to sleep, and food to eat. There are millions of mothers and babies who struggle every day to find shelter. I had to see this through their perspective to fully empathize with them about the horrible effects of this virus.

Saving Moses sees them. They aren’t left behind or forgotten.

Saving Moses goes into the places where many others won’t and restores hope in the lives of so many. We see that every day when babies come running into our centers with smiles on their faces and can rest peacefully in their little beds, knowing they are safe for the night.

If you’re looking for ways to make a difference in this challenging time, please consider donating $25 for a Care Box. The mother’s story above is just 1 of several mothers who have been positively impacted by receiving a Care Box. You can be the difference. Start today. Contact info@savingmoses.org for more information on how you can help.

May 22, 2020

The Effects of COVID-19 on NightCare

Written by Saving Moses Communication’s Coordinator, McKenzie Thompson The news about the global COVID-19 outbreak spread almost as fast as the virus itself, but several questions were left unanswered. Where did it originate? When will it be over? Will I lose my job? Questions like these have flooded the minds of people all ... Read More»

October 3, 2019

Surviving the Underpass - Title Page

A guest post by Stephanie Drawdy, a Team Trip Volunteer from the summer of 2019.

There is a Southeast Asian community that once lived in a slum known as Plankville. Its citizens lived high above running sewage and maneuvered in and out of their homes on rickety boards that often gave way. Some, including little ones who had just learned to walk, would oftentimes fall into the refuse. So, when this community was relocated to a concrete underpass surrounded by weaving lanes of heavy traffic, this was considered an upgrade.

When I first stepped out of the tuk-tuk to visit this area, my senses were jarred. There was a stench in the air that is inevitable when the heat of Asia meets the corrals of toilets that line one wall of this community. Flickering light danced on the muddy narrow path leading into this village cluttered with trash and overpopulated with need. The mix of massive trucks and tiny mopeds, heavily laden with all manner of baskets and people, whizzed past. The cacophony of the passing engines creating a fitting soundtrack for the disturbing existence to which I bore witness.

Surviving the Underpass - children in Cambodia standing on a balcony with trash underneath them.

A gray film covered everything, from the rows of hand-washed laundry hung out to dry on makeshift lines to the rows of toddlers who called this place home. Their little heads popped out from behind blankets nailed to the entrances of cave-like homes and from behind concrete columns towering above our heads. One set of bright, dark eyes blinked at me. Then another. And another. Soon, a jovial brood had gathered – some smiling mischievously as they vied for attention; some hiding shyly behind their siblings. They paused, and then ran barefoot ahead of me through puddles of muck, looking over their shoulders as if to say, please follow. And so I did.Surviving the Underpass - a little girl in Cambodia standing in a mud puddle.

Turning the bend, I watched as this boisterous flock crawled onto the edge of the underpass and perched themselves beneath an improvised tent of tarps, sticks and string. Here, we played. And laughed. And spoke a language that needed no words. Older boys and girls flipped tiny decks of cards with impressive dexterity while the younger ones leaned in to watch. I watched too, as an overload of thoughts, emotions and concerns flashed through my heart and mind. At that moment, I fell in love with this ragtag bunch of Batman emblems, peace symbols, and endearing smiles.

When it was time for the group I was with to press on, one little boy, wearing only a long red American t-shirt, followed close behind. His bare feet and petite face were beautiful, yet marked with the filth of the underpass. He had held tightly to a small green toy truck and trailed it along the edge of a worn table as we played. The twinkle in his eyes and the playful giggle exuding from his belly belied his surroundings. He didn’t yet know the magnitude of lack he was borne into, the utter despair that his “facts” predicted for his future.

Surviving the Underpass - a painting by a volunteer of a toddler in the streets.
A water color painting by the author, Stephanie Drawdy.

The adults in that community have a sense of acceptance – they see no turn for the good on their horizon. Yet, they hold out hope for the next generation. They care for them with a loving tenderness. They give them everything they have, which is mostly love.

The despair emanating from that underpass was palpable; the need for hope and vision overwhelming. This is given one person at a time. And, Saving Moses is in the midst of communities like this doing just that – acting as a haven of hope to offer a different reality to babies and toddlers like my sweet little friends from the underpass. Saving Moses plants seeds of hope and vision into the future of the developing world, one unique soul at a time.

October 3, 2019

Surviving the Underpass

A guest post by Stephanie Drawdy, a Team Trip Volunteer from the summer of 2019. There is a Southeast Asian community that once lived in a slum known as Plankville. Its citizens lived high above running sewage and maneuvered in and out of their homes on rickety boards that often gave way. Some, including little... Read More»

June 12, 2018

Why you will see fewer faces from us - title page

If you love Saving Moses, it’s because we save and protect babies.

Sometimes, this means protecting them against the threat of death by malnutrition. Sometimes, it’s the threat of abuse and exploitation by the sex industry. Today, this means taking a close look at our own policies and saying, “We can do more.”

After careful thought and much discussion, we have decided as an organization to change our child protection policy in the media.

The sex industry is so heavily stigmatized. In some countries, being identified as the child of a sex worker means that you do not get admittance to school, cannot receive medical care, or are ostracized from your community. We cannot control who views the images or videos we put online and are not willing to expose babies to harassment or danger. This is why things must change.

What this means for you:

  1. Fewer Faces

There will be fewer faces in our pictures and videos. If a baby or mother’s face is concealed, it is because we have identified that sharing their image puts them in danger. If a face is shown, it is either a representation or the image of a child we have identified is not in danger.

  1. New Names

All names are changed for the protection of the baby or toddler. We will use culturally-appropriate pseudonyms to tell true stories.

  1. Countries, Major Cities, or Regions Only

Specific locations will be concealed so that people with intent to harm cannot locate the people with whom we work.

We know that we work with really cute kids, and it helps you as an interested partner or donor to see their smiling faces. We recognize that at times, it may feel that the images of little hands or little feet are less compelling. But our responsibility is to the babies and toddlers we serve first.

It is our sincere hope that you will partner with us in understanding this need for protection and that you will joyfully join us in saving babies every day where help is most urgent but least available.

This change will take time as we phase out certain content and develop more. If you have questions concerning our new child protection policy, feel free to reach out at info@savingmoses.org.

Child protection policy - a little boy's hands and feet.A baby's hands covering her face to comply with our child protection policy.A mother holding her baby in NightCare with their faces covered to comply with our child protection policy.

June 12, 2018

Why You Will See Fewer Faces From Us

If you love Saving Moses, it’s because we save and protect babies. Sometimes, this means protecting them against the threat of death by malnutrition. Sometimes, it’s the threat of abuse and exploitation by the sex industry. Today, this means taking a close look at our own policies and saying, “We can do more.” After careful... Read More»

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